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Category: Tutorials (page 2 of 6)

Premiere Pro Crash Course

This video is a crash course on Premiere Pro.

I’ll take you through creating a new project, creating and organizing bins, importing footage, creating a sequence, different methods of editing clips into your timeline, basic trimming, keyboard shortcuts, adding graphics, adjusting effect parameters, creating titles, keyframing, adjusting audio levels, adding music, adding effects such as gaussian blur, color correction, the Lumetri Color panel, the Lumetri Scopes panel, how to export and much, much more!

Phew. Did you catch all that? All of that is jammed into one Premiere Pro crash course. If you’re new or newish to Premiere Pro or just want a refresher in case you missed something along the way this video is for you.

Recommended Viewing: Watch Me Edit in Premiere Pro

There is so much more to Premiere Pro and this crash course just scratches the surface. I hope these 22 minutes can get you started (or refreshed) in Premiere and give you a fighting chance on your first project.

If/when you get stuck, reach out. Let’s figure this thing out together. Also check out my friends at Premiere Bro — they have a ton of resources, tutorials, and news about Premiere Pro.

The music used in this video was “Hey Hi Hello” by Mikey Geiger. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link).

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Create Vlog in Premiere Pro

Hi there! This is a completely new style video for this channel. Watch me create a vlog for my other YouTube channel in Premiere Pro.

Here is a list of some of the topics covered in the video:

  • Duplicating a sequence
  • Importing footage and music
  • Replacing footage in the timeline
  • How I like to edit and create a vlog in Premiere Pro
  • Syncing audio and clips together
  • How to mute an audio track
  • Linking and unlinking tracks
  • Fixing 1080p footage in a 720p sequence
  • Swapping graphics in a sequence
  • Using replace clip from source monitor
  • Creating titles (in Vietnamese!!) in Premiere
  • And lots, lots more.

This video is 42 minutes long so grab some popcorn and let’s go!

Watch the final edited video I created in this video here

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial on how to create a vlog in Premiere Pro. Leave a comment if you have any questions.


Music used in this video, “Ocean Waves” by PALA, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.


Additional Suggested Reading: Copy and Paste in Premiere Pro

Did you enjoy this article? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

– Josh

Prevent Offline Media Using Media Creation Settings in Avid Media Composer — EVF Tutorial

This tutorial explains how to use Avid Media Composer’s Media Creation settings to prevent offline media. MC’s Media Creation settings allows you to set what drive and resolution media is created to. TL;DR set this drive and resolution when you first open up a project so the next time you open the project none of your media is offline because it was created to the correct drive.

Music used in this video, “Back To My House” by PALA, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Add Edit in Premiere Pro

This tutorial explains how to perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro similar to how you would in Avid Media Composer. There’s a number of ways to do this and it varies from how one would do it in Media Composer. This quick tutorial explains it all.

Recapping Add Edit in Premiere Pro Tutorial

What is an Add Edit?

If you’re switching over from Avid Media Composer over to Premiere Pro you’re probably wondering how the heck you do an Add Edit. I know this was one of the first things that really made my scratch my head when I started learning Premiere Pro.

In case you aren’t familiar with Avid’s terminology, an Add Edit is basically how to split a clip in the timeline into two (or more) pieces. There are dozens of editing scenarios where this can be useful.

Keyboard Shortcut for Making an Add Edit in Premiere Pro

To perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro first check to see which tracks are selected in the timeline. Whichever tracks are active will have the Add Edit applied to it in just a second. Move the time position indicator to where you want to split the clip. When ready use the keyboard shortcut Command+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+K if you’re on a PC. If the video is linked to audio in the timeline then both parts of the clip will have the Add Edit applied.

Example timeline in Premiere Pro with Add Edit applied

To apply the Add Edit or split all tracks no matter which tracks are selected, use the keyboard shortcut Command+Shift+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+Shift+K if you’re on a PC. This applies the Add Edit to all tracks at the time position indicator.

A note for you Avid Media Composer users: You cannot create Add Edits on black in the timeline. I know, I know. I’m not a fan of that either.

Using Premiere Pro’s Razor Tool to Make an Add Edit

An alternative to those keyboard shortcuts is to use the Razor Tool. First, find the Razor Tool in the Tools Panel. The keyboard shortcut to activate the Razor Tool is “C”.

Razor Tool in Premiere

Then with the Razor Tool active click on any clip and at point on the timeline. It’ll create an Add Edit wherever you click on whatever clip you click on. You don’t have to worry about which tracks are selected. However I find it a bit more cumbersome to use and not as frame accurate.


Note: Some links in this article are affiliate links. All that means is that if you were to purchase something from the site after clicking the link, like Amazon, I would get a small commission. It’s no extra cost to you and maybe one day from it I’ll be able to buy a 6-pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Peyton some pumpkin Fruitables.

The music used in this video was “Throwback Thursday” by Mikey Geiger. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.


Additional Suggested Viewing: How to Edit a Vlog in Premiere Pro

Did you enjoy this video? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

– Josh

Change Layer Name in After Effects

This tutorial explains how to change the name of a layer in Adobe After Effects and what the difference is between Source Name and Layer Name and how to toggle between the two.

Recapping Tutorial on How to Change the Name of a Layer in After Effects

In the timeline of your composition find the column called Source Name. To change the name of a layer, select the layer then hit the Return key. The text will highlight. Next change the name of the layer to whatever you want it to be. In the video I change the CmdEdit-Logo layer to just Logo.

Once you do this the first time the Source Name column will change to Layer Name. The rest of the layers that you haven’t renamed will get brackets [ ] around their name with the exception of light layers 💡.

There’s a number of reasons to do this but the big two for me are 1) if another editor or motion graphics artist will be using this project or 2) the source names just aren’t clean and you want your project a bit tidier. For a simple composition like in the video it won’t make much of a difference however when you get 75-100+ layers deep naming your layers matters so much!

If you want to go back and see the Source Name of the layers, click on the column heading that now says Layer Name and it’ll switch back. Repeat this step as needed.

That is how to change the name of a layer in After Effects. Hope you found this walk-through helpful!


Suggested Additional Viewing: Show and Hide Properties in After Effects Tutorial

Music used in this video, “Camino” by Matt Wigton, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.

If you enjoyed this tutorial on how to change the name of a layer in After Effects. Want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video, newsletter, etc.? You can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff.

– Josh

How Video Editors Get Paid — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 82

Hey there!

In this episode of the Command+Edit Podcast Nick and I discuss the most important topic when it comes to freelance video editing…how to get paid!

Topics include what software and services we use to invoice, how to invoice, how we accept payments, how long it takes to get paid, whether you need to have an LLC in order to freelance and taxes in the US and Canada.

As a reminder neither Nick or I am a tax professional or financial advisor by any stretch of the imagination. What we talk about is based solely our experience as two freelance video editors.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Using the Timecode Window in Avid Media Composer — EVF Tutorial

This tutorial teaches you what Avid Media Composer’s Timecode Window is and how to use it. This tool is hidden by default but can provide you with a ton of useful information while you edit your videos. You’ll learn how to change the display of the tool, how to add lines of information like the duration of a timeline and what lines of information could be useful to have available to you.

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Fixed vs. Elastic Keyframes in Avid Media Composer – EVF Tutorial

This tutorial teaches you the difference between fixed keyframes and elastic keyframes in Avid Media Composer. We’ll use an example clip with a 3D Warp Effect on it and I’ll demonstrate what both types of keyframes do and why you would use each of them.

BTW, I publish a weekly newsletter called the Video Editor’s Digest. In it you’ll get awesome tips, tricks, resources and news about video editing. I’d love for you to be a part of it. You can sign up here!

How to Create a Grid in After Effects

This tutorial will teach you how to create a grid in After Effects. You’ll learn how to change the color of the grid, how to change the size of the grid and how to animate the grid.

Recapping Tutorial on How to Create a Grid in After Effects

To get started have After Effects open (obviously) and a Comp created. The size doesn’t matter but I’m working with 1920×1080 in the video. In the composition I have a white solid that’s the size of my Comp acting as the background.

Step 1: Apply Grid Effect to New Layer

Next find the Effects & Presets Panel. If you don’t have it open go under the Window menu at the top of the screen to open it up. Type in “grid” to find the grid effect. We’ll come back to this in a moment!

Grid Effect in Effects & Presets Panel in After Effects

Create a new solid in your Comp that’s the composition size. The color doesn’t matter. Name this layer Grid please. Take the Grid effect from the Effects & Presents Panel and drop it onto the layer you just created named Grid. When you do this it may look like nothing has happened if you’re using a white background like I am. Don’t worry, the grid is there. We just need to change the color.

Step 2: Adjusting the Grid

With the “Grid” layer selected, find the Effects Control Panel. In here you’ll see the Color parameter. Click the box and change the color to the color you want your grid to be.

Besides changing the color, there’s a couple other options you should mess around with. For starters I like to change the Size From setting from Center Point to Height & Width Sliders.

Grid Effect Settings for Size From in After Effects

The Width and Height sliders are now active in Effect Controls once you do this. The slider only goes to a value of 200 but you can manually type in a number larger than that if needed. In the video I use a value of 300 for the Width and Height.

Step 3: Change Location of Grid in After Effects

Next let’s change where the grid is on the screen. You do this by adjusting the Anchor parameter.

Grid Effect Controls in After Effects

Just like virtually any parameter in After Effects you can keyframe the Anchor for the Grid you are creating. Do this by clicking the Stopwatch next to Anchor. Move the time position indicator to another point in your Comp. Then change the Anchor values. Give it a RAM Preview and check it out.

Step 4: Other Parameters to Adjust

To change the thickness of the lines you’ll use the Border parameter. You can twirl down the Feather parameter to adjust the width and height of any feathering you want to do to the grid.

Lastly the Opacity parameter will make your grid more or less transparent. Mess around as needed! That is how to create a grid in After Effects.


You can download the After Effects project I used in the tutorial to create the grid here: Click here to download the After Effects Grid Tutorial Project


Additional Suggested Viewing: How to Create Guides in After Effects

Did you enjoy this video? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

EVF Tutorial – Trim To Fill Effect in Avid Media Composer

This tutorial covers the Trim To Fill Effect in Avid Media Composer. Trim To Fill is crazy easy to use especially compared to an effect like Timewarp. I’ll show you how to expand and shrink the timing of a clip in just a couple simple steps.

BTW, I recently started a fun weekly newsletter called the Video Editor’s Digest. In it you’ll get awesome tips, tricks, resources and news about video editing. I’d love for you to be a part of it. You can sign up here!