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Category: Premiere Pro (page 1 of 2)

How to Export an MP3 from Premiere Pro in a Minute

This tutorial will teach you how to export an MP3 from Premiere Pro. An MP3, or .mp3, is a common codec and file extension for digital audio files. Because of their small file sizes, MP3s are generally used in the web delivery of content but they can lack the robust quality an uncompressed WAV file can give you. So depending on what you’re creating you may need to output an .mp3. Follow these steps and you’ll be able to export an MP3 from Premiere Pro in less than a minute.

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How to Export a jpg from Premiere Pro

This tutorial will teach you how to export a .jpg from Premiere Pro. .jpg stands for JPEG and is a common file extension for still graphics.

Exporting a .jpg from Premiere Pro is useful if you need to send a client or director a frame of video. It could be to ask a question like, “Is this the shot you’re talking about?” You can also export a .jpg from Premiere Pro so you can make a custom thumbnail for a YouTube video.

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The Video Editor’s Digest | Edition #39

Hey there and welcome back to the Video Editor’s Digest!

In case you’re new around here, in the Video Editor’s Digest you get the lowdown on some cool happenings from around the internet on things related to video editing, video production, or just being a creative professional. It also gives me a chance to update you about new pieces on the EVF website and YouTube channel and tell you any freelance, work, or life stories I may have.

If you have a resource of your own or one you stumble across that you want to share in a future Video Editor’s Digest, you can submit it here.

Alright, let’s get into it!

Quick Tip!

Always fiddling with the settings in Adobe Media Encoder? Create your own presets by clicking the button that’s circled in the picture. After you save your preset it’ll appear at the top of the Preset dropdown list for that format. I have 10 or so presets saved for what it’s worth.

Adobe Media Encoder Export Settings with Save Preset button circled
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The Video Editor’s Digest | Edition #37

Hey there and welcome back to the Video Editor’s Digest!

In case you’re new around here, in the Video Editor’s Digest you get the lowdown on some cool happenings from around the internet on things related to video editing, video production, or just being a creative professional. It also gives me a chance to update you about new pieces on the EVF website and YouTube channel and tell you any freelance or work stories I may have.

One last thing before getting started. I created a form for you to submit resources of your own or ones you stumble across for publication in future Video Editor’s Digests. You can access it here.

Alright, let’s get into it!

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Create Vlog in Premiere Pro

Hi there! This is a completely new style video for this channel. Watch me create a vlog for my other YouTube channel in Premiere Pro.

Here is a list of some of the topics covered in the video:

  • Duplicating a sequence
  • Importing footage and music
  • Replacing footage in the timeline
  • How I like to edit and create a vlog in Premiere Pro
  • Syncing audio and clips together
  • How to mute an audio track
  • Linking and unlinking tracks
  • Fixing 1080p footage in a 720p sequence
  • Swapping graphics in a sequence
  • Using replace clip from source monitor
  • Creating titles (in Vietnamese!!) in Premiere
  • And lots, lots more.

This video is 42 minutes long so grab some popcorn and let’s go!

Watch the final edited video I created in this video here

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial on how to create a vlog in Premiere Pro. Leave a comment if you have any questions.


Music used in this video, “Ocean Waves” by PALA, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.


Additional Suggested Reading: Copy and Paste in Premiere Pro

Did you enjoy this article? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

– Josh

Show Used Clips In Premiere Pro

This tutorial teaches you how to show used clips (video, audio, music, title, .psd, etc.) in your Premiere Pro project and if so then where to find them in your sequence(s).

Recapping How to Show Used Clips in Premiere Pro

Open up the bin who’s clips you want to see if they’ve been used. In order to do this, first change the bin to icon view. If there’s a gray icon or no icon in the lower right corner of the clip it has not been used. If there’s a blue icon then the clip has been used.

Premiere Pro bin in icon view

Blue icon in the corner means it’s been used. Gray or no icon means it has not been used.

Click on the blue icon to reveal where it has been used. Lastly, click on the selection options that appear and as a result you’ll be taken to that point in the sequence. That’s it! Easy peasy.

Premiere Pro bin clicking blue icon to show where clip has been used

Click on the blue icon to show in what sequence(s) and where it was used.

Recommended Viewing: Copy and Paste in Premiere Pro

“Zipline Zebra” by Mikey Geiger was the music used in this video. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link).

I hope you enjoyed this tutorial. Do you want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video, newsletter, etc.? Go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff. 😀

– Josh

Add Edit in Premiere Pro

This tutorial explains how to perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro similar to how you would in Avid Media Composer. There’s a number of ways to do this and it varies from how one would do it in Media Composer. This quick tutorial explains it all.

Recapping Add Edit in Premiere Pro Tutorial

What is an Add Edit?

If you’re switching over from Avid Media Composer over to Premiere Pro you’re probably wondering how the heck you do an Add Edit. I know this was one of the first things that really made my scratch my head when I started learning Premiere Pro.

In case you aren’t familiar with Avid’s terminology, an Add Edit is basically how to split a clip in the timeline into two (or more) pieces. There are dozens of editing scenarios where this can be useful.

Keyboard Shortcut for Making an Add Edit in Premiere Pro

To perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro first check to see which tracks are selected in the timeline. Whichever tracks are active will have the Add Edit applied to it in just a second. Move the time position indicator to where you want to split the clip. When ready use the keyboard shortcut Command+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+K if you’re on a PC. If the video is linked to audio in the timeline then both parts of the clip will have the Add Edit applied.

Example timeline in Premiere Pro with Add Edit applied

To apply the Add Edit or split all tracks no matter which tracks are selected, use the keyboard shortcut Command+Shift+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+Shift+K if you’re on a PC. This applies the Add Edit to all tracks at the time position indicator.

A note for you Avid Media Composer users: You cannot create Add Edits on black in the timeline. I know, I know. I’m not a fan of that either.

Using Premiere Pro’s Razor Tool to Make an Add Edit

An alternative to those keyboard shortcuts is to use the Razor Tool. First, find the Razor Tool in the Tools Panel. The keyboard shortcut to activate the Razor Tool is “C”.

Razor Tool in Premiere

Then with the Razor Tool active click on any clip and at point on the timeline. It’ll create an Add Edit wherever you click on whatever clip you click on. You don’t have to worry about which tracks are selected. However I find it a bit more cumbersome to use and not as frame accurate.


Note: Some links in this article are affiliate links. All that means is that if you were to purchase something from the site after clicking the link, like Amazon, I would get a small commission. It’s no extra cost to you and maybe one day from it I’ll be able to buy a 6-pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Peyton some pumpkin Fruitables.

The music used in this video was “Throwback Thursday” by Mikey Geiger. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.


Additional Suggested Viewing: How to Edit a Vlog in Premiere Pro

Did you enjoy this video? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

– Josh