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Tag: freelance video editing (page 1 of 2)

The only thing you need to succeed in 2019

(Sorry for the clickbait-y title… I’m rusty at writing good, catchy titles)

It’s early in 2019. The confetti is still falling. Most of us are back to the office. Ready or not it’s time to begin another year in our careers. Another year of our lives.

Looking back at 2018 maybe there was something you didn’t do. Something you didn’t learn. Or something you didn’t accomplish. A project, a habit, a new NLE to master, a documentary to edit. So we look to 2019 as our saving grace. We have a whole fresh calendar for us to get X done. And that fills us with a glimmer of hope. That we can make that change this year. Heck, we have 12 whole months.

As the confetti is swept up and the hangovers from NYE are cured, we head back to the edit bay or cubical or home office. We got this in 2019. Then…we check our email.

Read more

Finding Your Path from Student to Professional Editor with Grace Novak — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 86

Hey there!

This is a very special episode of the Command+Edit Podcast. I interview Grace Novak. Grace is in the midst of one of the scariest points in her life — trying to figure out how to make the jump from student to professional.

Our discussion focuses on topics such as networking strategies, how to make the most of internships, how to adjust to the professional world from student life, and how to market yourself with your website and demo reel.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Side Hustles for Video Editors — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 85

Hey there! In this episode of the Command+Edit Podcast Nick and I discuss ways to earn income from side hustles using your post production abilities. Side hustles for video editors has never been more important. Nick and I give our insights from the past decade we’ve both been freelancing full and part-time.

Topics Covered in Side Hustles for Video Editors Podcast

We cover topics such as is it realistic to make money from YouTube and blogging, is selling stock footage still “a thing”, finding one-off work from online job market sites, approaching local businesses for work, what size companies to go after for work, and much more.

Listen to the Episode!

Josh’s Main Advice When Approaching Companies You Want to Have a Side Hustle With

One of my main pieces of advice is to go after companies that aren’t too small but aren’t too large. I recommend companies that are approximately 7-30 people. In this range most companies won’t have a full-time video team or team member. And can afford to pay realistic rates for video services. Companies that are 1-6 people generally are less likely able to pay the rate you are looking for. The companies that are 31+ people very likely could have staff already on board or that they frequently use for video services. 7-30 employees is the sweet spot from my experience.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

If you enjoyed this conversation on side hustles for video editors and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video, newsletter, etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff.

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Revealing My Freelance Video Editor Rate

Let’s cut right to the chase: My hourly freelance video editor rate is $65. $65 an hour buys you whatever professional services I can provide — video editing, producing, project managing, coaching, QCing, media managing, voice-over artisting, sitting in meetings, etc.

If that’s all you wanted to know you can stop reading. But if you want to know why, the history behind it and why that number fluctuates I’ll try my best to explain it below.

When I first started freelancing I was charging $20/hour. That was in 2009 and it felt like SO MUCH MONEY. It kinda is when you’re 22 years old post-grad paying $550/month in rent for some sh**** room in a duplex with your college buddies.

How did I land on that number? I have no idea. $25 felt like too much and my first client said yes to $20/hour.

Over the years as the confidence in my skills grew so did that number. $20 became $25. $25 became $30. Then it stayed there for awhile. Freelance at that point was only part time and was extra money on top of my salary (even though that salary wasn’t much). I felt good about what I was charging and so did my clients because they were getting a bargain and still are.

Once I took the leap into freelancing I had to bring that number up. So I bumped it to a range of $35-$55/hour. I’d start by asking for $55/hour but knew I could be negotiated down to $35 or $40 for most projects. If they said yes to $55/hour then sweet! Otherwise I was still happy with the haul I was taking home.

Then once I had been in the #freelancelife for a few months I realized I needed to raise that number. The extra taxes you pay as a freelancer are killer. There is no way I could have charged that much and maintained my lifestyle. Also there is absolutely no way I could have done full-time freelancing if I wasn’t married. Seriously all you single people freelancing paying for your own health care are so courageous. Hats off to you because I do not have the balls to do that.

BTW here’s a conversation Nick and I had on getting charging for jobs and getting paid

Where was I… Oh yeah. Raising my rates again.

I realized I needed to raise my rate so I did. $65/hour. And at that point my range jumped to $45-$65. However I’d be hard-pressed to say yes to anything below $55. I made up my mind and had to stick to that range. Even if you need the money you can still say no and ultimately make more. More times than not my freelance client was willing to come up to at least $50. That $50 fit in my range so I’d take those jobs.

Plot twist!

Several months ago I ended up taking a full-time job. But I had all this freelance work still coming in. In order to justify taking more work and jamming it into an already packed schedule (thanks to this site, Command+Edit, trying to have a somewhat normal social life, etc.) I had to raise my rates again. Now my rate is a firm $65/hour, no matter what. I will not take any less unless there’s a crazy reason like it’s for a non-profit and I’m 110% behind their cause and feel the urge to help. Otherwise…$65/hour. For everything.

If I can get more, of course I’m going to try. But 99% of the time all I’m looking for is $65/hour. That’s the sweet spot. That’ll get me to forsake happy hours and Netflix and podcasting so I can bring in a little extra coin.

My freelancing situation is more than likely different from yours. My rate works for me and it took a very long time to figure out and become comfortable talking about. In all honestly I probably should and could charge more. I know in the next year or so I’ll raise my rates again because my time will become more valuable. And in a year or so I’ll raise it again. Put this cycle on repeat until I retire.

Talking about your freelance video editor rate is something we editors do not do enough. That’s why I was only charging $20 an hour in the beginning. I didn’t know what I could charge. I had no one to talk to about this. My advice is charge as much as you comfortably can. Negotiating what we get paid is the most difficult part of our job but literally it is the #1 thing that matters because it is our job.

If you want to share your freelance video editor rate and start more conversation around rates please do so in the comments below.

If you found this article helpful could you do me a favor and share it with an editor or freelancer who could use it? Thanks.

Cheers,
Josh

PS: If you’re new around here and want to be notified whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 👊🏼

The most difficult part about mastering a skill

Time for a little free writing session…

There are an infinite amount of projects one can work on. New project after new project pop into our heads and we want to pursue each one. So we start down a path hoping to make this one great thing. But then a new idea pops in our heads for something completely different. Ahead, the path we’re currently on seems shrouded in mystery and overgrown with bushes and thrones. So we backtrack and start down a new path.

Path through the woods

Photo by Zack Silver courtesy of Unsplash

We get far enough down this new path when the same thing happens. Maybe we go a little further this time before starting something new. Maybe we stop at the first bend in the road or rain cloud in the sky. Time for a new path.

The hardest thing about accomplishing a project or completing a goal or mastering a skill is staying on that same path regardless of obstacles.

A path I recently vacated was learning Vietnamese. I reached a point in my Mango lessons where it was too difficult to retain the information in the time I was allowing myself to focus on the mission. My willpower was gone and I have zero guidance. I quit. I gave up. It got too hard. The thrones were too much to take. Read more

Some brief thoughts on creating creative work

There several dozen half-written and probably twice as many fully-written but never published blog posts scattered across my computer, laptop, Google Drive and various Moleskins. They contain thoughts I’ve had on many post production-related topics that I’ve worked countless hours on. And they’re just sitting there in digital purgatory.

“It’s not good enough.”

“Someone could say that you don’t mention ______ method/shortcut/etc.”

“You aren’t really an expert. Who are you to give advice?”

I could think of endless reasons not to ship each one of them.

Today I was watching some random YouTube video from this guy another YouTube guy I routinely watch recommended. His production quality was low. He knew it. But he said something that struck a nerve with me.

Read more

How Video Editors Get Paid (Podcast)

In this episode of the Command+Edit Podcast Nick and I discuss the most important topic when it comes to freelance video editing…how video editors actually get paid!

Topics include what software and services we use to invoice, how to invoice, how we accept payments, how long it takes to get paid, whether you need to have an LLC in order to freelance, and taxes in the US and Canada.

As a reminder neither Nick or I am a tax professional or financial advisor by any stretch of the imagination. What we talk about is based solely our experience as two freelance video editors.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

Related Reading: Revealing My Freelance Video Editor Rate

Please share you thoughts below in the comments on what you do. How do you invoice and accept payments as a video editor? Do you have an LLC?

If you enjoyed this conversation on how video editors get paid and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Small Business Tactics for Editors: An Interview with Editor Rachel Bastarache Bogan — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 80

Hey there!

Rachel Bastarache Bogan is the owner of Renegade Digital Post — a video editing company providing Hollywood-caliber services to filmmakers and content producers outside of Hollywood. In this interview, Nick and I find out Rachel’s strategies for working with new clients, how she finds clients not only locally but across the globe, and much more.

Here are some useful links from this episode:

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Starting a Post Production Company in Jamaica with Twain Richardson

Twain Richardson Owner of Post Production Company in Kingston, Jamaica

Hey there! In this episode Nick and I bring our friend Twain Richardson on as a guest to discuss post production in Jamaica. Twain tells us all about setting up a career and creating a post production company right in the heart of Jamaica. Establishing oneself in a market where production is pretty sparse compared to the likes of LA and NY can be incredibly challenging. While most people feel the pressure to move to Hollywood to “go where the work is”, there are those who thrive where they are and set themselves as a niche service provider in the TV and commercial industry. I can relate immensely.

Podcast on Post Production In Jamaica with Twain Richardson

Notes from the Episode

Here are some timecodes of the topics if you want to jump around:

  • ~11:30 Introduction to Twain
  • ~12:20 What is Jamaica’s client base like?
  • ~13:58 Describing his workspace layout
  • ~15:05 Twain’s origin story: go to work or go to school?
  • ~19:09 Getting a mentor early in your career
  • ~20:33 How do you tell a good story?
  • ~21:19 Twain’s “Frame of Reference” site filled with valuable interviews with established editors
  • ~25:58 The value of networking and asking questions from other editors out there; great lessons learned from talking with the pros
  • ~31:20 Have you ever felt the pressure to relocate and why did you decide to stay put?
  • ~33:43 Big differences in work environment depending where you are geographically – Are there still deadlines in Jamaica?

You can find Twain over on Twitter here.

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video, newsletter, etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff.

– Josh

PS: The song used in today’s episode was Apex by Kevin Graham over on Soundstripe (affiliate link). Use the coupon code EVF for a 10% discount on a monthly or yearly subscription. 😉


Additional Listening: Side Hustles for Video Editors | Command+Edit Episode 85

The Office Life — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 78

 

Hey there!

Nick and I are back together for a conversation about the differences, pros, cons, productivity levels, emotions, etc. between editing from a conventional office and your home office.

We also catch up and recap my recent trip up to Toronto to visit Nick and meet him IRL for the first time. Hope you enjoy!

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh