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Tag: post production tips (page 1 of 10)

How Video Editors Stay Productive

Image of Calendar with text saying How Video Editors Stay Productive

Thursday 6:24PM.

There are 4 things I’ve blown off doing this afternoon/evening that were marked on my calendar. That’s a problem. A calendar should be a sacred thing. Something shouldn’t go on your calendar if it can move. Once you put it on your calendar you execute whatever it is no matter what.

It stems from me not doing my weekly review this past Sunday or the Sunday before then for that matter.

The first thing on my calendar for this afternoon was to do my weekly review, even though it’s not Sunday. I know that the weekly review is my way of getting organized mentally and digitally for the upcoming week. Without it…not much gets done. I’m lost. There are too many uncompleted tasks sitting in the tool I use to organize everything. My calendar is as strong as a wet paper towel.

Okay, so what’s a weekly review? Without going too far into the weeds, I roughly follow the “Getting Things Done” method of productivity/organization. And the tool I use to organize it all is called OmniFocus. I have both the desktop and mobile version because I’m a psycho.

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Fighting Decision Fatigue as a Video Editor

Fighting Decision Fatigue as a Video Editor

This article discusses what decision fatigue is and how to fight it as a video editor.

Introducing the Problem of Decision Fatigue

Wayyy back when I wrote a post called something like, “Done is Better than Perfect”. The TL;DR of it was that most of the time getting a video project out the door and delivered is better than having a perfect video project. Getting your video over to your client, director, producer, or audience is more important than having the video be 100% flawless.

The perfect video project simply doesn’t exist (unless you count Interstellar which by all accounts is the greatest movie ever made 😉). There will always be adjustments you could make. There could always be shots that need more color correction. More audio that needs sweetening. Different pacing, shot selection, etc. The thing about videos is that we’re making a 1,000-piece puzzle with 10,000 pieces while not being able to see the box to see what we’re supposed to be creating.

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The only thing you need to succeed in 2019

(Sorry for the clickbait-y title… I’m rusty at writing good, catchy titles)

It’s early in 2019. The confetti is still falling. Most of us are back to the office. Ready or not it’s time to begin another year in our careers. Another year of our lives.

Looking back at 2018 maybe there was something you didn’t do. Something you didn’t learn. Or something you didn’t accomplish. A project, a habit, a new NLE to master, a documentary to edit. So we look to 2019 as our saving grace. We have a whole fresh calendar for us to get X done. And that fills us with a glimmer of hope. That we can make that change this year. Heck, we have 12 whole months.

As the confetti is swept up and the hangovers from NYE are cured, we head back to the edit bay or cubical or home office. We got this in 2019. Then…we check our email.

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Locked vs. Unlocked Tracks in Avid Media Composer

What is the difference in locked and unlocked tracks in Avid Media Composer?

This video explains locked and unlocked tracks in Avid Media Composer. It is a companion tutorial for Lesson 4 of the Mastering Avid Media Composer’s Keyboard Shortcuts Series. Knowing this concept will keep you from knocking your clips out of sync. 👊🏼

(all of this ⬇️ is explained in the video ⬆️)

You have the choice to lock or unlock a timeline track. I highly recommend locking your tracks. In fact, I pretty much only edit with my tracks locked. There are a handful of times where it’s more useful for me to unlock them but 99% of the time they’re locked.

When you “lock a track” in After Effects or Premiere Pro it means you cannot make any changes to it. That’s not what this is in Media Composer. Locking tracks syncs the given timecode for all locked tracks, locking them together so if you make changes (i.e. adding or removing time to a track by editing in or editing out a clip) to one then you make changes to them all.

Here’s a scenario: You have clips on V1 and V2 and the tracks are locked. Both clips begin at 01:02:20:14 and end at 01:02:24:14 – they’re 4 seconds long. If you have V1 selected and you extract from 01:02:21:10 to 01:02:22:10 (1 second) then the clips on V1 and V2 shorten by a second. Both clips would end at 01:02:23:14. If the tracks were unlocked however the clip on V1 would shorten to 3 seconds and the clip on V2 would remain the same.

I find that more times than not I want everything on the timeline to react together. If I shorten a clip on V1 at 01:03:00:00 I don’t want to have to think about the rest of the clips further down the timeline that are synced up with clips and audio on other tracks getting knocked out of alignment.

Locking tracks keeps you from unintentionally knocking your timeline out of sync. It takes some time to wrap your head around it but IMO it’s the safest, quickest and best way to edit. Leave me a comment if you’re confused about anything.

Music used in this video, “Endless Summer” by Mikey Geiger, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Premiere Pro Crash Course

This video is a crash course on Premiere Pro.

I’ll take you through creating a new project, creating and organizing bins, importing footage, creating a sequence, different methods of editing clips into your timeline, basic trimming, keyboard shortcuts, adding graphics, adjusting effect parameters, creating titles, keyframing, adjusting audio levels, adding music, adding effects such as gaussian blur, color correction, the Lumetri Color panel, the Lumetri Scopes panel, how to export and much, much more!

Phew. Did you catch all that? All of that is jammed into one Premiere Pro crash course. If you’re new or newish to Premiere Pro or just want a refresher in case you missed something along the way this video is for you.

Recommended Viewing: Watch Me Edit in Premiere Pro

There is so much more to Premiere Pro and this crash course just scratches the surface. I hope these 22 minutes can get you started (or refreshed) in Premiere and give you a fighting chance on your first project.

If/when you get stuck, reach out. Let’s figure this thing out together. Also check out my friends at Premiere Bro — they have a ton of resources, tutorials, and news about Premiere Pro.

The music used in this video was “Hey Hi Hello” by Mikey Geiger. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link).

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Add Edit in Premiere Pro

This tutorial explains how to perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro similar to how you would in Avid Media Composer. There’s a number of ways to do this and it varies from how one would do it in Media Composer. This quick tutorial explains it all.

Recapping Add Edit in Premiere Pro Tutorial

What is an Add Edit?

If you’re switching over from Avid Media Composer over to Premiere Pro you’re probably wondering how the heck you do an Add Edit. I know this was one of the first things that really made my scratch my head when I started learning Premiere Pro.

In case you aren’t familiar with Avid’s terminology, an Add Edit is basically how to split a clip in the timeline into two (or more) pieces. There are dozens of editing scenarios where this can be useful.

Keyboard Shortcut for Making an Add Edit in Premiere Pro

To perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro first check to see which tracks are selected in the timeline. Whichever tracks are active will have the Add Edit applied to it in just a second. Move the time position indicator to where you want to split the clip. When ready use the keyboard shortcut Command+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+K if you’re on a PC. If the video is linked to audio in the timeline then both parts of the clip will have the Add Edit applied.

Example timeline in Premiere Pro with Add Edit applied

To apply the Add Edit or split all tracks no matter which tracks are selected, use the keyboard shortcut Command+Shift+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+Shift+K if you’re on a PC. This applies the Add Edit to all tracks at the time position indicator.

A note for you Avid Media Composer users: You cannot create Add Edits on black in the timeline. I know, I know. I’m not a fan of that either.

Using Premiere Pro’s Razor Tool to Make an Add Edit

An alternative to those keyboard shortcuts is to use the Razor Tool. First, find the Razor Tool in the Tools Panel. The keyboard shortcut to activate the Razor Tool is “C”.

Razor Tool in Premiere

Then with the Razor Tool active click on any clip and at point on the timeline. It’ll create an Add Edit wherever you click on whatever clip you click on. You don’t have to worry about which tracks are selected. However I find it a bit more cumbersome to use and not as frame accurate.


Note: Some links in this article are affiliate links. All that means is that if you were to purchase something from the site after clicking the link, like Amazon, I would get a small commission. It’s no extra cost to you and maybe one day from it I’ll be able to buy a 6-pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Peyton some pumpkin Fruitables.

The music used in this video was “Throwback Thursday” by Mikey Geiger. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.


Additional Suggested Viewing: How to Edit a Vlog in Premiere Pro

Did you enjoy this video? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

– Josh

Increment and Save in After Effects

This tutorial explains how Increment and Save works in Adobe After Effects. It’s a simple method for backing up your projects as you work without having to quit out of AE.

Keyboard shortcut:
Mac – Cmd+Opt+Shift+S
PC – Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S

Increment and Save Tutorial Recap

Increment and Save in After Effects takes your AE project file and adds a number to it. Let’s say your project is titled Sample Project 01. When you use Increment and Save the project file becomes Sample Project 02. Do it again and it becomes Sample Project 03.

This is super useful whenever you’re doing something complex or anything you aren’t completely sure if it’ll work. It allows you to iterate without fear of having to do too many undos.

You can repeat this as often as needed. I typically do this every 30-40 minutes. When I was first getting started with After Effects I was doing it like every 5 minutes lol. AE project files are typically pretty small so I don’t ever find file sizes becoming an issue. In a worst-case scenario you can always delete some of the really old iterations of the project.

Finder folder showing Increment and Save of After Effects projectsYou can perform an Increment and Save either by going to the File menu and choosing Increment and Save or using the keyboard shortcut (see above!).

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Finding Your Path from Student to Professional Editor with Grace Novak — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 86

Hey there!

This is a very special episode of the Command+Edit Podcast. I interview Grace Novak. Grace is in the midst of one of the scariest points in her life — trying to figure out how to make the jump from student to professional.

Our discussion focuses on topics such as networking strategies, how to make the most of internships, how to adjust to the professional world from student life, and how to market yourself with your website and demo reel.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Show and Hide Properties in After Effects

This tutorial covers different keyboard shortcuts in Adobe After Effects to show and hide layer properties. You’ll learn the transform shortcuts, how to show and hide keyframed properties, how to show and hide any altered property and more.

Recapping Tutorial on Show and Hide Properties

To show and hide the Transform properties in After Effects use the following keyboard shortcuts P.A.R.T.S. This is explained below. Select a layer and hit the p, a, r, t, or s key.

  • P = Position
  • A = Anchor Point
  • R = Rotation
  • T = Opacity (for this think T for o-pac-i-TEE or T for Transparency)
  • S = Scale

If you want to show multiple properties, hit one of the P.A.R.T.S. keys then hold Shift then hit another. You can add more than one property as well.

To show or hide the Masks properties of a layer hit the M key. If you hit the M key twice in a row rapidly it’ll show all the Mask parameters.

Next, if you want to see just the properties on layers with keyframes on them hit the U key. I recommend hitting Command+A (Mac) or Control+A (PC) first to select all the layers then hit the U key to see all keyframes on all properties on every layer. When you hit the U key twice in a row rapidly any property that has been adjusted will show up.

One last bonus tip! Hold down the Shift key plus the Option key (Mac) or Alt key (Windows) and click on a parameter and it’ll hide it from view.


Additional Suggested Viewing: Increment and Save in After Effects Tutorial

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh