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Tag: post production tips (page 2 of 10)

Fix Offline Title in Avid Media Composer

This tutorial explains how to fix an offline title in Avid Media Composer two different ways. If you have a title that is offline, there’s no need to worry. You can fix it in seconds. I show you how in this video.

Here’s a quick recap of the video that explains how to fix an offline title in Avid Media Composer:

Offline Title in Sequence — Method #1

  1. Place your time position indicator (the blue bar in the timeline) over top of the offline title.
  2. Go to the Clip menu at the top and select Re-create Title Media.
  3. Select the bin and resolution.
  4. Boom! You got yourself a title that’s now online.

Bonus Tip — Under the Timeline’s Fast Menu, select Clip Color and make sure Offline is checked. This will show you offline clips in red in your timeline.

Offline Title in Bin — Method #2

  1. Select offline title in the bin.
  2. Go to the Clip menu at the top and select Create Unrendered Title Media.
  3. Boom! You got yourself a title that’s now online.

Recommended Viewing: Title Tool Shortcuts Tutorial for Avid Media Composer

The music used in this video was “Paper Trail” by Travis Loafman. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link).

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Prevent Offline Media Using Media Creation Settings in Avid Media Composer — EVF Tutorial

This tutorial explains how to use Avid Media Composer’s Media Creation settings to prevent offline media. MC’s Media Creation settings allows you to set what drive and resolution media is created to. TL;DR set this drive and resolution when you first open up a project so the next time you open the project none of your media is offline because it was created to the correct drive.

Music used in this video, “Back To My House” by PALA, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Add Edit in Premiere Pro

This tutorial explains how to perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro similar to how you would in Avid Media Composer. There’s a number of ways to do this and it varies from how one would do it in Media Composer. This quick tutorial explains it all.

Recapping Add Edit in Premiere Pro Tutorial

What is an Add Edit?

If you’re switching over from Avid Media Composer over to Premiere Pro you’re probably wondering how the heck you do an Add Edit. I know this was one of the first things that really made my scratch my head when I started learning Premiere Pro.

In case you aren’t familiar with Avid’s terminology, an Add Edit is basically how to split a clip in the timeline into two (or more) pieces. There are dozens of editing scenarios where this can be useful.

Keyboard Shortcut for Making an Add Edit in Premiere Pro

To perform an Add Edit, or split a clip, in Premiere Pro first check to see which tracks are selected in the timeline. Whichever tracks are active will have the Add Edit applied to it in just a second. Move the time position indicator to where you want to split the clip. When ready use the keyboard shortcut Command+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+K if you’re on a PC. If the video is linked to audio in the timeline then both parts of the clip will have the Add Edit applied.

Example timeline in Premiere Pro with Add Edit applied

To apply the Add Edit or split all tracks no matter which tracks are selected, use the keyboard shortcut Command+Shift+K if you’re on a Mac or Control+Shift+K if you’re on a PC. This applies the Add Edit to all tracks at the time position indicator.

A note for you Avid Media Composer users: You cannot create Add Edits on black in the timeline. I know, I know. I’m not a fan of that either.

Using Premiere Pro’s Razor Tool to Make an Add Edit

An alternative to those keyboard shortcuts is to use the Razor Tool. First, find the Razor Tool in the Tools Panel. The keyboard shortcut to activate the Razor Tool is “C”.

Razor Tool in Premiere

Then with the Razor Tool active click on any clip and at point on the timeline. It’ll create an Add Edit wherever you click on whatever clip you click on. You don’t have to worry about which tracks are selected. However I find it a bit more cumbersome to use and not as frame accurate.


Note: Some links in this article are affiliate links. All that means is that if you were to purchase something from the site after clicking the link, like Amazon, I would get a small commission. It’s no extra cost to you and maybe one day from it I’ll be able to buy a 6-pack of Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Peyton some pumpkin Fruitables.

The music used in this video was “Throwback Thursday” by Mikey Geiger. It was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.


Additional Suggested Viewing: How to Edit a Vlog in Premiere Pro

Did you enjoy this video? If so, I’d love to keep in touch. All you have to do is go here to stay in the loop on new blog posts, tutorials, and announcements.

– Josh

Change Layer Name in After Effects

This tutorial explains how to change the name of a layer in Adobe After Effects and what the difference is between Source Name and Layer Name and how to toggle between the two.

Recapping Tutorial on How to Change the Name of a Layer in After Effects

In the timeline of your composition find the column called Source Name. To change the name of a layer, select the layer then hit the Return key. The text will highlight. Next change the name of the layer to whatever you want it to be. In the video I change the CmdEdit-Logo layer to just Logo.

Once you do this the first time the Source Name column will change to Layer Name. The rest of the layers that you haven’t renamed will get brackets [ ] around their name with the exception of light layers 💡.

There’s a number of reasons to do this but the big two for me are 1) if another editor or motion graphics artist will be using this project or 2) the source names just aren’t clean and you want your project a bit tidier. For a simple composition like in the video it won’t make much of a difference however when you get 75-100+ layers deep naming your layers matters so much!

If you want to go back and see the Source Name of the layers, click on the column heading that now says Layer Name and it’ll switch back. Repeat this step as needed.

That is how to change the name of a layer in After Effects. Hope you found this walk-through helpful!


Suggested Additional Viewing: Show and Hide Properties in After Effects Tutorial

Music used in this video, “Camino” by Matt Wigton, was purchased and licensed through my friends at Soundstripe (affiliate link). For 10% off a subscription use the code EVF at checkout.

If you enjoyed this tutorial on how to change the name of a layer in After Effects. Want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video, newsletter, etc.? You can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff.

– Josh

Increment and Save in After Effects

This tutorial explains how Increment and Save works in Adobe After Effects. It’s a simple method for backing up your projects as you work without having to quit out of AE.

Keyboard shortcut:
Mac – Cmd+Opt+Shift+S
PC – Ctrl+Alt+Shift+S

Increment and Save Tutorial Recap

Increment and Save in After Effects takes your AE project file and adds a number to it. Let’s say your project is titled Sample Project 01. When you use Increment and Save the project file becomes Sample Project 02. Do it again and it becomes Sample Project 03.

This is super useful whenever you’re doing something complex or anything you aren’t completely sure if it’ll work. It allows you to iterate without fear of having to do too many undos.

You can repeat this as often as needed. I typically do this every 30-40 minutes. When I was first getting started with After Effects I was doing it like every 5 minutes lol. AE project files are typically pretty small so I don’t ever find file sizes becoming an issue. In a worst-case scenario you can always delete some of the really old iterations of the project.

Finder folder showing Increment and Save of After Effects projectsYou can perform an Increment and Save either by going to the File menu and choosing Increment and Save or using the keyboard shortcut (see above!).

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Finding Your Path from Student to Professional Editor with Grace Novak — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 86

Hey there!

This is a very special episode of the Command+Edit Podcast. I interview Grace Novak. Grace is in the midst of one of the scariest points in her life — trying to figure out how to make the jump from student to professional.

Our discussion focuses on topics such as networking strategies, how to make the most of internships, how to adjust to the professional world from student life, and how to market yourself with your website and demo reel.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

If you enjoyed this conversation and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 🙂

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Show and Hide Properties in After Effects

This tutorial covers different keyboard shortcuts in Adobe After Effects to show and hide layer properties. You’ll learn the transform shortcuts, how to show and hide keyframed properties, how to show and hide any altered property and more.

Recapping Tutorial on Show and Hide Properties

To show and hide the Transform properties in After Effects use the following keyboard shortcuts P.A.R.T.S. This is explained below. Select a layer and hit the p, a, r, t, or s key.

  • P = Position
  • A = Anchor Point
  • R = Rotation
  • T = Opacity (for this think T for o-pac-i-TEE or T for Transparency)
  • S = Scale

If you want to show multiple properties, hit one of the P.A.R.T.S. keys then hold Shift then hit another. You can add more than one property as well.

To show or hide the Masks properties of a layer hit the M key. If you hit the M key twice in a row rapidly it’ll show all the Mask parameters.

Next, if you want to see just the properties on layers with keyframes on them hit the U key. I recommend hitting Command+A (Mac) or Control+A (PC) first to select all the layers then hit the U key to see all keyframes on all properties on every layer. When you hit the U key twice in a row rapidly any property that has been adjusted will show up.

One last bonus tip! Hold down the Shift key plus the Option key (Mac) or Alt key (Windows) and click on a parameter and it’ll hide it from view.


Additional Suggested Viewing: Increment and Save in After Effects Tutorial

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post / podcast / video / newsletter / etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh

Side Hustles for Video Editors — Command+Edit Podcast Episode 85

Hey there! In this episode of the Command+Edit Podcast Nick and I discuss ways to earn income from side hustles using your post production abilities. Side hustles for video editors has never been more important. Nick and I give our insights from the past decade we’ve both been freelancing full and part-time.

Topics Covered in Side Hustles for Video Editors Podcast

We cover topics such as is it realistic to make money from YouTube and blogging, is selling stock footage still “a thing”, finding one-off work from online job market sites, approaching local businesses for work, what size companies to go after for work, and much more.

Listen to the Episode!

Josh’s Main Advice When Approaching Companies You Want to Have a Side Hustle With

One of my main pieces of advice is to go after companies that aren’t too small but aren’t too large. I recommend companies that are approximately 7-30 people. In this range most companies won’t have a full-time video team or team member. And can afford to pay realistic rates for video services. Companies that are 1-6 people generally are less likely able to pay the rate you are looking for. The companies that are 31+ people very likely could have staff already on board or that they frequently use for video services. 7-30 employees is the sweet spot from my experience.

Some items mentioned in the episode include:

If you enjoyed this conversation on side hustles for video editors and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video, newsletter, etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff.

– Josh

Music in this episode was from Soundstripe. Use the code EVF for 10% off!

Please note some of the links above are affiliate links. This means if you purchase something through them I’ll get a small commission at no extra cost to you.

The most difficult part about mastering a skill

Time for a little free writing session…

There are an infinite amount of projects one can work on. New project after new project pop into our heads and we want to pursue each one. So we start down a path hoping to make this one great thing. But then a new idea pops in our heads for something completely different. Ahead, the path we’re currently on seems shrouded in mystery and overgrown with bushes and thrones. So we backtrack and start down a new path.

Path through the woods

Photo by Zack Silver courtesy of Unsplash

We get far enough down this new path when the same thing happens. Maybe we go a little further this time before starting something new. Maybe we stop at the first bend in the road or rain cloud in the sky. Time for a new path.

The hardest thing about accomplishing a project or completing a goal or mastering a skill is staying on that same path regardless of obstacles.

A path I recently vacated was learning Vietnamese. I reached a point in my Mango lessons where it was too difficult to retain the information in the time I was allowing myself to focus on the mission. My willpower was gone and I have zero guidance. I quit. I gave up. It got too hard. The thrones were too much to take. Read more

Black and White Video Tutorial in Avid Media Composer

This tutorial shows how to create black and white video in Avid Media Composer using the Color Correction tool. It also teaches how to keyframe the saturation of a clip so you can change from full color to black and white over time.

Recapping the Tutorial

Make Video Black and White

Place the time position indicator over your clip. This is the blue bar in the timeline. Make sure that track is selected. I tend to turn off the other tracks. You can use the keyboard shortcut of Command+Shift+A (Mac) or Control+Shift+A (PC) to deselect all tracks. Then use the appropriate track selection keyboard shortcut if there is one to select the track.

In the Windows menu, find Workspaces then select Color Correction. This will open up the Color Correction Tool. Under the HSL tab, select the Controls panel (I think this is called a panel? Maybe not. Just hit the Controls button 😅). Now find Saturation and make it a value of zero. You can drag the slider all the way to the left or type in 0 in the space under Saturation. This clip is now black and white! You’ll see there’s now an effect icon on the clip in the timeline.

Keyframing Black and White Video Effect

Let’s say we want to keyframe this effect so we go from color to black and white or vice versa over time.

Open the Effect Controls Tool. There’s an icon for it in the Color Correction Tool. Move the time position indicator to the part of the clip where you want your effect to start. I find it easier to move it inside the Effect Controls Tool and in the Timeline in this instance. Next in the Effect Controls Tool twirl down HSL, Controls, and Master. Find Saturation. Now right-click in the space to the right for Saturation in the Effect Controls Tool (see video above if you need help finding this!) and choose Add Keyframe.

Next move the time position indicator to where you want the video to go to black and white. Right-click in the space to the right for Saturation in the Effect Controls Tool and choose Add Keyframe. Then change the Saturation amount to zero (0). Go back to Source/Record Mode and playback your masterpiece. That’s how to create black and white video in Avid Media Composer!


Suggested Viewing: Fixed vs. Elastic Keyframes in Avid Media Composer Tutorial

If you enjoyed this tutorial and want to stay in touch whenever I come out with a new post, podcast, video,  newsletter, etc. you can go here to signup. No spam. Ever. Just the good stuff 😀

– Josh